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The Flame of Olympus (Pegasus)

A young girl, a winged horse, and a war of epic proportions make for an adventurous start to an exciting new trilogy.

When Pegasus crashes onto a Manhattan roof during a terrible storm, Emily’s life changes forever. Suddenly allied with a winged horse she’d always thought was mythical, Emily is thrust into the center of a fierce battle between the Roman gods and a terrifying race of multiarmed stone warriors called the Nirads. Emily must team up with a thief named Paelen, the goddess Diana, and a boy named Joel in order to return Pegasus to Olympus and rescue the gods from a certain death.

     Along the way, Emily and her companions will fight monsters, run from a government agency that is prepared to dissect Pegasus, and even fly above the Manhattan skyline—all as part of a quest to save Olympus before time runs out.A young girl, a winged horse, and a war of epic proportions make for an adventurous start to an exciting new trilogy.

When Pegasus crashes onto a Manhattan roof during a terrible storm, Emily’s life changes forever. Suddenly allied with a winged horse she’d always thought was mythical, Emily is thrust into the center of a fierce battle between the Roman gods and a terrifying race of multiarmed stone warriors called the Nirads. Emily must team up with a thief named Paelen, the goddess Diana, and a boy named Joel in order to return Pegasus to Olympus and rescue the gods from a certain death.

     Along the way, Emily and her companions will fight monsters, run from a government agency that is prepared to dissect Pegasus, and even fly above the Manhattan skyline—all as part of a quest to save Olympus before time runs out.

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2 Responses

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  1. Liviania says

    Perfect for Percy Jackson fans Percy Jackson fans will be happy to learn that there’s a new set of Olympians in town. Originally published in the UK, Kate O’Hearn’s Pegasus trilogy is coming to the US. Released just last month was the first book, THE FLAME OF OLYMPUS.Written in the third point of view, the narration flips back and forth between Paelen, a thief god, and Emily, a young New Yorker. Paelen attempted to steal Pegasus’ bridle during a battle between the Olympians and Nirads and ended up zapped to present time. Emily found Pegasus injured on her roof and a group of men in black found Paelen with the bridle. But both Pegasus and the bridle are needed to save Olympus.No adventure is complete if the ragtag band of heroes isn’t likeable. Emily and her classmate Joel are resourceful children willing to work hard to protect their friends. Joel may need to learn to control his temper, but Emily is already skilled at doing the right thing even when its hard. Paelen could take a few lessons from her. He begins the story a coward, but begins to change as he figures out what truly gets you respect. On the thief scale of one to Eugenides, he’s certainly no Eugenides, but he grows on you. All considered, it’s easy to root for their victory over the Nirads and cruel secret agent goons.THE FLAME OF OLYMPUS might be inappropriate for some younger readers due to the number of deaths, at least one of which is fairly gruesome, and brief scenes of torture. It’s nothing I didn’t read at that age, but I try to note these things for those with sensitive children.Young mythology fans will enjoy THE FLAME OF OLYMPUS and eagerly wait for the rest of the series to be released stateside. And it does not fall into my series pet peeve. THE FLAME OF OLYMPUS tells a complete story, although there are threads left dangling to be addressed in the next book.

  2. Anonymous says

    Please understand that all my reviews focus on the interests of my middle school students. I never do a full plot synopsis in a review.O’Hearn does a very good job of creating likable, realistic characters. Emily, the heroine, is a resourceful, deep-thinking, middle school girl who is still mourning the death of her mother. When she discovers that Pegasus has crash-landed on her apartment building’s roof, she soon recognizes she needs help and turns to her surly classmate Joel because she knows he is obsessed with mythological beings, especially Pegasus. As they face adversity together, their friendship grows and they develop a deep bond that stops just short of a romance. During their adventures, they join forces with Paelen (an Olympian who has been, to this point, a sneaky thief) and Diana (the goddess of the hunt). Emily’s dad, Steve, a NYC cop, also plays a fairly large role, but O’Hearn never really bothers to develop his character.The pace of the plot is very quick, with very few slow spots. In a book this short, you would expect some depth to be missing, and you would be right. If you are like me, you walk away wanting a few things to have been delved into a bit more deeply. In this story, the Olympian gods (of the Roman, not Greek, sort) have been brought to the brink of destruction by monsters called Nirads. They are creations of O’Hearn, not conventions of traditional mythology. The only thing that can harm them is gold from Pegasus’s bridle. And now you know as much about them as you will if you read the book.Brevity sometimes leads to shortcuts. In the case of this book, O’Hearn uses a nefarious government agency that is apparently outside the control of Congress, the President, and the People. They answer to no one and are authorized to use any force they deem necessary in order to achieve their goals. This includes torturing children. I make sure to tell kids that check out the book from my in-class library that this is simply a plot invention to help move the story. I don’t want my students to give their government carte-blanche trust, but I don’t want them afraid to challenge it either. I wish O’Hearn had instead created an evil villain who circumvented the protocols instead of authoring them.All-in-all, this is a solid story that most middle school kids will finish.

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